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And this model in this condition, almost flawless condition, now I'd say this is worth about

And this model in this condition, almost flawless condition, now I'd say this is worth about $1,500, or $1,600, or $1,700. These are just some of the reasons why the answer to the question "What's it worth? But since then, there's been a bit of a panic in concertina use. Value can change: The value of an item is dependent upon many things, including the condition of the object itself, trends in the market for that kind of object, and the location where the item will be sold.APPRAISER: And you knew this was a concertina and not an accordion? And though there are no hard and fast rules, an object's auction price can often be half its retail value; yet for other objects, an auction price could be higher than retail. And this one is an English concertina, and this is octagonal in shape, and it's made by the firm of Charles Wheatstone in London. For example, you'll often hear them say what an item is worth "at auction," or "retail," or "for insurance purposes" (replacement value). Often an auctioneer will talk about what she knows best: the auction market.From another he ran away, but was captured at Windsor, not far from the theatre of his practical telegraph.As a boy he was very shy and sensitive, liking well to retire into an attic, without any other company than his own thoughts.Yours Peter Scott Reply written by Concertinas-uk at 7/12/2016, am Hi Peter. I can do the work for you, it is very unlikely that the cost of the work would exede the value of the instrument. Reasonable condition but needs restoration, box with no key (fairly standard for that, I would think). There are 24 buttons on each side and all seem to work.

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And this model in this condition, almost flawless condition, now I'd say this is worth about $1,500, or $1,600, or $1,700. These are just some of the reasons why the answer to the question "What's it worth?

But since then, there's been a bit of a panic in concertina use. Value can change: The value of an item is dependent upon many things, including the condition of the object itself, trends in the market for that kind of object, and the location where the item will be sold.

APPRAISER: And you knew this was a concertina and not an accordion? And though there are no hard and fast rules, an object's auction price can often be half its retail value; yet for other objects, an auction price could be higher than retail.

And this one is an English concertina, and this is octagonal in shape, and it's made by the firm of Charles Wheatstone in London. For example, you'll often hear them say what an item is worth "at auction," or "retail," or "for insurance purposes" (replacement value). Often an auctioneer will talk about what she knows best: the auction market.

,500, or

And this model in this condition, almost flawless condition, now I'd say this is worth about $1,500, or $1,600, or $1,700. These are just some of the reasons why the answer to the question "What's it worth? But since then, there's been a bit of a panic in concertina use. Value can change: The value of an item is dependent upon many things, including the condition of the object itself, trends in the market for that kind of object, and the location where the item will be sold.APPRAISER: And you knew this was a concertina and not an accordion? And though there are no hard and fast rules, an object's auction price can often be half its retail value; yet for other objects, an auction price could be higher than retail. And this one is an English concertina, and this is octagonal in shape, and it's made by the firm of Charles Wheatstone in London. For example, you'll often hear them say what an item is worth "at auction," or "retail," or "for insurance purposes" (replacement value). Often an auctioneer will talk about what she knows best: the auction market.From another he ran away, but was captured at Windsor, not far from the theatre of his practical telegraph.As a boy he was very shy and sensitive, liking well to retire into an attic, without any other company than his own thoughts.Yours Peter Scott Reply written by Concertinas-uk at 7/12/2016, am Hi Peter. I can do the work for you, it is very unlikely that the cost of the work would exede the value of the instrument. Reasonable condition but needs restoration, box with no key (fairly standard for that, I would think). There are 24 buttons on each side and all seem to work.

||

And this model in this condition, almost flawless condition, now I'd say this is worth about $1,500, or $1,600, or $1,700. These are just some of the reasons why the answer to the question "What's it worth?

But since then, there's been a bit of a panic in concertina use. Value can change: The value of an item is dependent upon many things, including the condition of the object itself, trends in the market for that kind of object, and the location where the item will be sold.

APPRAISER: And you knew this was a concertina and not an accordion? And though there are no hard and fast rules, an object's auction price can often be half its retail value; yet for other objects, an auction price could be higher than retail.

And this one is an English concertina, and this is octagonal in shape, and it's made by the firm of Charles Wheatstone in London. For example, you'll often hear them say what an item is worth "at auction," or "retail," or "for insurance purposes" (replacement value). Often an auctioneer will talk about what she knows best: the auction market.

,600, or

And this model in this condition, almost flawless condition, now I'd say this is worth about $1,500, or $1,600, or $1,700. These are just some of the reasons why the answer to the question "What's it worth? But since then, there's been a bit of a panic in concertina use. Value can change: The value of an item is dependent upon many things, including the condition of the object itself, trends in the market for that kind of object, and the location where the item will be sold.APPRAISER: And you knew this was a concertina and not an accordion? And though there are no hard and fast rules, an object's auction price can often be half its retail value; yet for other objects, an auction price could be higher than retail. And this one is an English concertina, and this is octagonal in shape, and it's made by the firm of Charles Wheatstone in London. For example, you'll often hear them say what an item is worth "at auction," or "retail," or "for insurance purposes" (replacement value). Often an auctioneer will talk about what she knows best: the auction market.From another he ran away, but was captured at Windsor, not far from the theatre of his practical telegraph.As a boy he was very shy and sensitive, liking well to retire into an attic, without any other company than his own thoughts.Yours Peter Scott Reply written by Concertinas-uk at 7/12/2016, am Hi Peter. I can do the work for you, it is very unlikely that the cost of the work would exede the value of the instrument. Reasonable condition but needs restoration, box with no key (fairly standard for that, I would think). There are 24 buttons on each side and all seem to work.

||

And this model in this condition, almost flawless condition, now I'd say this is worth about $1,500, or $1,600, or $1,700. These are just some of the reasons why the answer to the question "What's it worth?

But since then, there's been a bit of a panic in concertina use. Value can change: The value of an item is dependent upon many things, including the condition of the object itself, trends in the market for that kind of object, and the location where the item will be sold.

APPRAISER: And you knew this was a concertina and not an accordion? And though there are no hard and fast rules, an object's auction price can often be half its retail value; yet for other objects, an auction price could be higher than retail.

And this one is an English concertina, and this is octagonal in shape, and it's made by the firm of Charles Wheatstone in London. For example, you'll often hear them say what an item is worth "at auction," or "retail," or "for insurance purposes" (replacement value). Often an auctioneer will talk about what she knows best: the auction market.

,700. These are just some of the reasons why the answer to the question "What's it worth? But since then, there's been a bit of a panic in concertina use. Value can change: The value of an item is dependent upon many things, including the condition of the object itself, trends in the market for that kind of object, and the location where the item will be sold.APPRAISER: And you knew this was a concertina and not an accordion? And though there are no hard and fast rules, an object's auction price can often be half its retail value; yet for other objects, an auction price could be higher than retail. And this one is an English concertina, and this is octagonal in shape, and it's made by the firm of Charles Wheatstone in London. For example, you'll often hear them say what an item is worth "at auction," or "retail," or "for insurance purposes" (replacement value). Often an auctioneer will talk about what she knows best: the auction market.From another he ran away, but was captured at Windsor, not far from the theatre of his practical telegraph.As a boy he was very shy and sensitive, liking well to retire into an attic, without any other company than his own thoughts.Yours Peter Scott Reply written by Concertinas-uk at 7/12/2016, am Hi Peter. I can do the work for you, it is very unlikely that the cost of the work would exede the value of the instrument. Reasonable condition but needs restoration, box with no key (fairly standard for that, I would think). There are 24 buttons on each side and all seem to work.

dating wheatstone concertina-76

dating wheatstone concertina-85

I will need to post it from NZ, but there seems to be no restorers here. Helen I have an 1860, 48 key rosewood Lachenal English concertina that needs restoring.It hasn't been played for over 50 years but still seems in decent working order with a rosewood box. The overall condition is used but good I would say.FRS (6 February 1802 – 19 October 1875), was an English scientist and inventor of many scientific breakthroughs of the Victorian era, including the English concertina, the stereoscope (a device for displaying three-dimensional images), and the Playfair cipher (an encryption technique).This update remains here for historical reasons, but is also a reminder on how little we knew (and how little was available) only a short time ago. Updating the article has proved difficult because of the rate at which new information has been appearing.Although I hope to release a full update sometime in 2005, much new information has already appeared in the Concertina History Forum at concertina.net, where you will be able to find many people willing to help with further questions.

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